Wars of Law

Oct 21

Grief is the echo of love 

- Robert Webb

Oct 19

Beethoven’s Bad Influence

newyorker:

image

Beethoven transformed music—but has veneration of him stifled his successors? In the magazine this week, Alex Ross examines the composer’s life and legacy:

“Beethoven is a singularity in the history of art—a phenomenon of dazzling and disconcerting force. He not only left his mark on all subsequent composers but also molded entire institutions. … The musicians’ platform became the stage of an invisible drama, the temple of a sonic revelation.”

Illustration by Daniel Adel

My jam

[video]

Oct 09

revolutionary-mindset:

Black students, as a group, are more than three times as likely as white students to get suspended. Racial disparities in school discipline are well-established. But what about differences in rates of discipline among black students?
Sociologists at Villanova University and the University of Iowa have found a striking pattern: the darker a black student’s skin tone, the higher the likelihood they’ll be suspended, particularly for girls. More specifically, an African-American girl with “the darkest skin tone” had triple the odds of being suspended “compared to those with the lighest skin tone,” wrote Villanova University professors Robert DeFina, Lance Hannon and University of Iowa professor Sarah Bruch. The pattern was weaker, but still present for black males. Black boys with the darkest skin tone were 2.5 times more likely than their lightest black male counterparts of being suspended.
The findings, drawn from data in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent health, held even when controlling for a host of other factors, including the socioeconomic status of parents, the students’ own behavior, and their academic achievement. The National Longitudinal Study of Youth, conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, documents skin tone across a 10-point spectrum.
In other words, researchers say, this is evidence of colorism at work. “It is important to remember that colorism is not simply “black-on-black” discrimination,” researchers wrote. “Colorism is a broad phenomenon where, for example, continuous variation in skin tone affects the actions of privileged authorities, who tend to be white. Colorism is intrinsically tied to racism in that white privilege is central to both.”

revolutionary-mindset:

Black students, as a group, are more than three times as likely as white students to get suspended. Racial disparities in school discipline are well-established. But what about differences in rates of discipline among black students?

Sociologists at Villanova University and the University of Iowa have found a striking pattern: the darker a black student’s skin tone, the higher the likelihood they’ll be suspended, particularly for girls. More specifically, an African-American girl with “the darkest skin tone” had triple the odds of being suspended “compared to those with the lighest skin tone,” wrote Villanova University professors Robert DeFina, Lance Hannon and University of Iowa professor Sarah Bruch. The pattern was weaker, but still present for black males. Black boys with the darkest skin tone were 2.5 times more likely than their lightest black male counterparts of being suspended.

The findings, drawn from data in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent health, held even when controlling for a host of other factors, including the socioeconomic status of parents, the students’ own behavior, and their academic achievement. The National Longitudinal Study of Youth, conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, documents skin tone across a 10-point spectrum.

In other words, researchers say, this is evidence of colorism at work. “It is important to remember that colorism is not simply “black-on-black” discrimination,” researchers wrote. “Colorism is a broad phenomenon where, for example, continuous variation in skin tone affects the actions of privileged authorities, who tend to be white. Colorism is intrinsically tied to racism in that white privilege is central to both.”

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Oct 07

africanstories:

Maasai Mara, Kenya
More on africanstories.tumblr.com

africanstories:

Maasai Mara, Kenya

More on africanstories.tumblr.com

“it is a large world. live a large life.” — nayyirah waheed (via artblackafrica)

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via artblackafrica)

[video]

theosos:

gifak-net:

[video]

how do they even survive in the wild?

theosos:

gifak-net:

[video]

how do they even survive in the wild?

(via jsahck)

Sep 30

breakingnews:

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution
SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.
Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong)

breakingnews:

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution

SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.

Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong)

pulitzercenter:

The world took little notice when, in the early 1990s, the peaceful Kingdom of Bhutan expelled some 100,000 ethnic Nepalis known as Lhotsampas, or “people from the south.” The Lhotsampas languished in refugee camps in Nepal until 2008 when the UN set the wheels in motion for one of the most ambitious refugee resettlement programs ever undertaken.
The U.S. has agreed to accept the largest number—about 75,000—and many of the new arrivals have ended up in the Pittsburgh area. Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit, both staffers on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, tell the remarkable story of a journey that stretches from the Allegheny Mountains of western Pennsylvania to the foothills of the Himalayas.
Julia, a photojournalist and former Pulitzer Center student fellow, captures revealing moments in the lives of these refugees while Moriah tells the stories of those left behind in the squalid camps and of the others trying to find their way in America. 

pulitzercenter:

The world took little notice when, in the early 1990s, the peaceful Kingdom of Bhutan expelled some 100,000 ethnic Nepalis known as Lhotsampas, or “people from the south.” The Lhotsampas languished in refugee camps in Nepal until 2008 when the UN set the wheels in motion for one of the most ambitious refugee resettlement programs ever undertaken.

The U.S. has agreed to accept the largest number—about 75,000—and many of the new arrivals have ended up in the Pittsburgh area. Pulitzer Center grantees Julia Rendleman and Moriah Balingit, both staffers on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, tell the remarkable story of a journey that stretches from the Allegheny Mountains of western Pennsylvania to the foothills of the Himalayas.

Julia, a photojournalist and former Pulitzer Center student fellow, captures revealing moments in the lives of these refugees while Moriah tells the stories of those left behind in the squalid camps and of the others trying to find their way in America. 

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Sep 29

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Sep 20

[video]

Sep 19

“When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.” —

A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States. (via africandogontheprairie)

I am finished.

(via dynamicafrica)

(via dynamicafrica)

[video]